Monday, March 19, 2018

Landmark and Encounter Placement within Hexagons


The standard Hexagon can be sub-divided into twelve lozenges/rhombi. This makes it very easy to simply roll 1d12 to place an item within the interior of a hex. The illustration below is numbered 1 to 12 (in a manner evoking the standard clock face) to illustrate this:



Another interesting side-effect of this tessellation is the creation of six additional overlapping Hexagons (each composed of 3 lozenges). These also each form an optical illusion of a cube:

These cubes could be used to accommodate/house larger, lozenge-spanning encounters/landmarks. The “3D” effect almost seems to imply that they could be useful to provide a rough guide/indicator of the highest/lowest points of elevation within a given hex.

This pattern/design was used in floor tiling within the Siena Cathedral in Italy:



I'm fairly sure quilters have been using innovative methods of tessellation to create hexagons for ages. 

This is not the only way to sub-divide a hex into uniform sections (although with 9 subsections, it's a little less useful with the standard dice, but the center sub-hex is interesting, and it's subdivisions can be rotated):


And of course, the more prosaic right-triangle “wedges:”

  
Some of this may go into my Expanded Wilderness Hexes document at some point. Once I finish up the "landmark" tables and polish up some additional wilderness navigation procedures.

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Wilderness Hexes - Version 1.0

One Hundred Wilderness Hexes, all linked in a single compiled document:




Current Terrains include: Forest, Mountain, Desert, Swamp and Ocean.

EDIT: Looks like some of the jump links don't really work too well in the embedded version above or when the PDF is opened in certain web browsers. They appear to work in a stand-alone PDF reader though, just make sure to check back for updates!

Drop me a line here if you spot anything odd/misspelled, broken links, or other issues. I'd also love to hear about how this works out at your table if you find it useful or any suggestions! Still contemplating a Printer-Friendly/POD version.

(file under maybe someday: 100 entries for each Terrain type...sitting pretty on a few dozen more Forest/Mountain hexes and I already have a few new Terrain Ideas)